Classical Music For Every Situation

when you think about your first love:

Mendelssohn – Violin Concerto in E Minor, II. Andante

when you drink a good cup of coffee:

El Jarabe Tanatio (The Mexican Hat Dance)

when you DIE:

Debussy – Violin Sonata, I. Allegro vivo

when you’re thinking about thinking:

Ysaye – Sonata for 2 Violins in A Minor, I. Poco lento

wedding:

Boccherini – Minuetto

when you’re in the mood for orchestral music:

Mahler- Symphony No. 5, IV- Adagietto

when you wanna take the less travelled road:

Prokofiev – Violin Sonata No.2, I. Moderato

when you feel like eating music (you read that right):

Bach – Violin Sonata No. 2 in A Minor BWV 1003, III. Andante

if you wanted to describe music to an alien:

Bach – Violin Partita No.3 in E Major BWV 1006, 1. Preludio

when you meet the love of your life (lol):

Bach – Violin Partita No.3 in E Major BWV 1006, 1. Preludio

if you could never listen to music again and this was your last piece:

Sibelius – Violin Concerto in D Minor, II. Adagio di melto

10 Things That Made 2019 Great

  1. Classical music. I could write about this forever.
  2. TwoSetViolin. God, these people are amazing.
  3. YLAC – the Counter Speech Fellowship.
  4. Bringing the iPod back to life. And downloading Hilary Hahn’s album onto it.
  5. Discovering music courses on coursera.
  6. Hank Green’s new book, A Beautifully Foolish Endeavour, being announced.
  7. Watching 30 hours of Project for Awesome livestreams.
  8. Careless Whisper.
  9. Chopin – Etude Op. 25 No.11. I jumped out of my seat the first time I heard it. My god.
  10. Claire de Lune. I still cry when I listen to it.

2020

To all my friends who take the time to read my blog, first of all, thank you. 2019 has been weirdly vivid and extremely terrifying in equal measures, and if you made it to the end with me, thank you. Second: this year has shown me what real fear feels like. It reaches to the deepest corner of your mind and it penetrates into your soul, and you definitely don’t feel like your best when it comes around. So those of you who went through a scary phase and came out alive, congratulations. You get to live another day, and I respect your resilience. Those of you fighting with regret over the things you couldn’t accomplish, it’s okay. 2020 is right around the corner, and god only knows what you’ll achieve. So keep going strong.

And most importantly: to those who embarked on journeys feeling scared, alone and out of love, but still persisted, I send all my strength out to you. You are a real player, and no matter what the circumstance, I assure you that in 2020, good things will come right to your doorstep.

Happy New Year.

My Mum and I Review Classical Music

Today we have something special, and something that involves someone besides me.

Say hello to my mum. Hi, ma.

Since I needed some original content to put up on the blog and since I’m running out of ideas, we decided to listen to a couple of classical music pieces together and see if we can come up with a decent review. Keep in mind that I am next to a noob in re classical music, and mum’s classical music knowledge is even lesser than mine. So I think we’ll have a nice little change of perspectives about how classical music is portrayed by the non-musical ear.

We’re doing this live, and we’re doing it blindly. Given that we have next to no knowledge about classical composers, this should be a pretty fair and unbiased review. We’ll be reviewing 5 pieces of classical music, and we’ll tell you how we feel!


1. Moonlight Sonata – Beethoven

Udita:

Okay, I know this piece. I’m currently learning this one on the keyboard. Are we still allowed to review it then? This was actually one of the first pieces I ever heard of Beethoven’s. I remember listening to it sometime in like, sixth grade, and thinking it sounded pretty morose. Now, because I’ve learnt enough about music theory and composition, I’ve come to appreciate it more than I would have expected. 7 out of 10.

Mum:

A mystical journey, with a person on a quest to find something. Very soothing as well as motivating. Like a soul string, it pulls at the right places and slows down at the right places

On days when you are searching for what’s bothering you, this piece can be a beautiful companion to arrive at the answer. 8 out of 10.


2. Prelude in C major – Bach

Udita:

The start seemed promising, with the upbeat tempo and all, then it sort of fell flat during the next two minutes or so. Definitely something I would enjoy listening to passively or in the background, but I probably wouldn’t pick this one out exclusively. Very light feel, though. I like it, just not enough. 6 out of 10.

Mum:

Filled with promise and hope. Like the clearing of clouds after a dark storm

Or an awakened mind after a bout of negative thoughts. The notes are strikingly similar to rays of light shining. 8 out of 10.


3. Eine kleine Nachtmusik – Mozart

Udita:

You’ve got to be kidding me.

Eine Kleine is so overused I might as well be listening to Justin Bieber at this point. That said, I can’t help but listening to it on repeat, I don’t know why. So happy. So cheerful. The fact that I’ve heard this tune since my Little Einstein-watching days means I’m comfortable around it and I don’t necessarily have the urge to fast forward every two seconds. I likey. 8 out of 10.

Mum:

It is a joyous celebration. Not meant for the light moments of reflection. It is filled with suspense, anticipation, thrill, and the calm of caution. It is a fun piece of extreme proportions. If someone gave me a million dollars and allowed me next to an ocean and mountains, I would play this music in my head. 7 out of 10.


4. Prelude Op.28 No.4 in E minor – Chopin

Udita:

Sounds like Chopin.

Instant 10.

Mum:

Too much of sharp notes that disturb the continuity of thought at the beginning. Contemplative mood, but not the kind that would allow you to come out through it. Music is not a companion. It plays on its own without adding any connection to the listener. 3 out of 10.


5. The Four Seasons — Spring – Vivaldi

Udita:

Vivaldiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!

Although this particular recording of Four Seasons seems slower than the original, I still love it. I have listened to a couple of orchestra recordings of Four Seasons and they all kill. Summer’s my favourite. Four Seasons on a whole, gets 7.5 out of 10. Spring and Summer both get a 9.

Mum:

Very exhilarating. Similar to piece #3. The lows and highs are intricate and build curiosity. Good for a day when the mind is free and waiting for good ideas to come. Not for a day when the mind is deep and needs reflection. 7 out of 10.


Well, there it is. I hadn’t expected the disparities between our reviews to be this polar, but it is what it is. Feel free to send in your own reviews in the comments below, we’d love to here what you have to say! Have a great day, cheers 🙂